AICAFMHA:
promoting mental health for young Australians

Australian Infant, Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health Association Ltd
ABN 87 093 479 022


Collated Mental Health News Items for 2010
Collated Mental Health News Items for 2010

Displaying items 1 to 5


CONSULTATION: Draft Standards - Integrated Care Pathways for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
The draft standards for Integrated Care Pathways (ICPs) for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMH) Services are now available for download and comment from the NHS Quality Improvement Scotland website.
We would like to receive your views on the draft standards in respect of:
- factual accuracy
- any critical omissions, and/or unnecessary information or inclusions, and
- how the standards could be applied in practice.
Submitting your comments
An online feedback form is available on our website. Comments on the draft standards for Integrated Care Pathways for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services should be submitted using the online form by close of business on Friday 4 February 2011.
If you have any queries regarding these draft standards, or the consultation process, please contact Catriona Macmillan, Project Officer, by telephone or email.
Email: catrionamacmillan@nhs.net
Telephone: 0131 623 4601
Consultation feedback
At the end of the consultation period all comments and responses will be collated. The CAMH ICP project group will respond to comments received on the draft standards. The response will explain how the comments were taken into account. The response will be on our website (www.nhshealthquality.org) and available from Catriona Macmillan, Project Officer.

Link related to this news item: www.nhshealthquality.org
Posted:Dec 21, 2010

UK is "sitting on mental health time-bomb" (YoungMinds, UK)
Coalition launches business plan for children and young people's mental health services.
A coalition of 14 charities including YoungMinds today launched a business case for children and young people's mental health and wellbeing at the House of Commons.
The Children and Young People's Mental Health Coalition warned that the UK is sitting on a mental health time-bomb and the consequences of failing to meet these mental health needs are colossal for children and young people, their families and the nation as a whole.
Sarah Brennan, chief executive of YoungMinds and chair of the coalition said: "One in ten children and young people has a diagnosable mental health problem such as depression or anorexia. We have evidence to show what works to help them and this will minimise future harm."
"This is the first time that the top charities in this field have joined together in order to issue this warning. The government can't afford to not invest in the future of children and young people?s mental health."
Launching its Business Case for children and young people's mental health and wellbeing, the coalition said that costs to the economy of mental ill health has been estimated at 105 billion a year in health, social care and other expenses. For example, a child with severe conduct disorder will cost society 150K over a lifetime whereas tailored parenting training for the family, which has proved to be effective in mitigating the disorder, costs 1,000.
The business case states: "Currently the Government is spending money on mopping up the consequences, not preventing it in the first place, and this also has an impact in other areas (e.g. teen pregnancy, crime, homelessness, drug/alcohol use and smoking)?"

Link related to this news item: www.youngminds.org.uk/mailshot-news/uk-is-201csitting-on-mental-health-time-bomb201d
Posted:Dec 21, 2010

Discussion paper launched on an Australian Children's Commissioner
The Australian Human Rights Commission has today launched a discussion paper on an Australian Children's Commissioner.
Many children in Australia are able to fully enjoy their human rights. However, the rights of some children are vulnerable.
An independent national Children's Commissioner with the power and mandate to listen to, understand and advocate for children could play an important role in promoting and protecting the rights of all children in Australia, particularly of those who are most at-risk.
In particular, a national Children's Commissioner could operate as a national advocate for children's rights; ensure that government decision making processes and outcomes are consistent with the best interests of children; develop mechanisms to secure the participation of children in decisions that affect them; and provide a coordinated national approach to children's rights.
Human rights provide a clear framework for promoting, and for ensuring accountability in respect of, child wellbeing. By establishing the office of a national Children's Commissioner, the Australian Government would take an important step towards meeting its international obligations to protect and promote the rights of children in Australia.

Link related to this news item: www.humanrights.gov.au/human_rights/children/2010_commissioner_children.html
Posted:Dec 21, 2010

Over 50,000 children looking after mentally ill parents (Craegmoor, UK)
Between 50,000 and 200,000 children are responsible for caring for their mentally-ill parents, according to a new report.
Research by the Mental Health Foundation, detailed in the MyCare report, has found that a vast number of young people are providing their parents with a high level of support, beyond what is appropriate for their age.
In many instances, this is putting their education and even their own mental health at risk.
The report concluded that more needs to be done to ensure that young carers are getting support they need and are not taking on too much.
Speaking to the Press Association, Dr Dan Robotham, senior researcher at the Mental Health Foundation, said: "While there are examples of good practice such as young carers' support groups, much more needs to be done to meet young carers' needs more effectively."
He added that there needs to be more age-appropriate mental health information made available and greater co-operation between children's, education and mental health services to give young carers the kind of support they deserve.
Visit MHF at http://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/our-work/children-and-young-people/mycare/

Link related to this news item: www.craegmoor.co.uk/industry-news/article/800272359/over-50000-children-looking-after-mentally-ill-parents/
Posted:Dec 21, 2010

Government grilled over mental health services (ABC Online)
Australia's first Mental Health Minister has faced a grilling from young people, who told him Australia should have more access to youth mental health services and better education to reduce stigma.
Mark Butler joined young people aged 15-25 in Sydney last night in an online forum covering topics ranging from suicide prevention to psychologist waiting lists.
Participants were up front and candid with Mr Butler, who is spending December conducting 14 mental health forums around Australia.
"At my school I didn't know anything about mental illness. I didn't learn anything about it," a commenter from Sydney said.
"Unfortunately it was through my dad having depression that I actually learnt about mental health. And even then I had no idea.
"Later on, when my father died [committed suicide] and I was facing depression, my school had a support network but they didn't understand what I was going through. It was like they weren't educated on mental health and they were just guessing."
The Government has limited programs in place in primary schools and high schools to raise awareness, and Mr Butler said more work would be done.

Link related to this news item: www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/12/09/3088795.htm?site=sydney
Posted:Dec 21, 2010


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