AICAFMHA:
promoting mental health for young Australians

Australian Infant, Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health Association Ltd
ABN 87 093 479 022


Collated Mental Health News Items for 2012
Collated Mental Health News Items for 2012

Displaying items 1 to 5


Ten-hut! Boot camps can't replace youth programs
While those in favour of correctional boot camps typically argue that the conditions imposed on young people are conducive to positive growth and change, critics argue that boot camps are likely to exacerbate feelings of anger and reinforce aggressive values and behaviours. Criminologists have also argued that authoritarian figures who give orders are inappropriate mentors for young offenders with histories of violence and anti-social behaviour. The evidence about the effectiveness of boot camps has been subject to rigorous analysis a number of times. Findings repeatedly show that boot camps are ineffective in reducing offending by young people unless a strong therapeutic program - one that addresses the educational, psychological, cognitive and family needs of the young person - is included.

Link related to this news item: theconversation.edu.au/ten-hut-boot-camps-cant-replace-youth-programs-10780?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+5+December+2012&utm_content=Latest+from+T
Posted:Dec 13, 2012

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children Affected by Sexual Abuse or Trauma
This issue brief explores research and practice on trauma focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT), which is an evidence-based treatment approach shown to help children, adolescents, and their caregivers overcome trauma-related difficulties. It is designed to reduce negative emotional and behavioral responses following child sexual abuse, domestic violence, traumatic loss, and other traumatic events. The treatment - based on learning and cognitive theories - addresses distorted beliefs and attributions related to the abuse and provides a supportive environment in which children are encouraged to talk about their traumatic experience. TF-CBT also helps parents who were not abusive to cope effectively with their own emotional distress and develop skills that support their children.

Link related to this news item: www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/trauma/
Posted:Dec 13, 2012

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Promising Practice Profiles
The Australian Institute of Family Studies is conducting a survey to improve understanding of the ways organisations are meeting the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, especially those with vulnerable children and those involved in the child protection system. This may include prevention programs or initiatives that aim to reduce the levels of disadvantage currently experienced by many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. They invite contributions from organisations and individuals who are achieving positive outcomes in this area. This survey is an excellent opportunity to contribute to the knowledge and learning in the field and to share your insight with others who are striving to make a difference in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. To make your contribution, please complete the online survey at https://surveys.aifs.gov.au/aifs/index.php?sid=88574&newtest=Y&lang=en. Submissions will close on 21 December 2012.

Link related to this news item: surveys.aifs.gov.au/aifs/index.php?sid=88574&newtest=Y&lang=en
Posted:Dec 13, 2012

Mental Health Organisations Join Forces to Create a Better Deal on Mental Health (Media Release MHCA)
More than ninety mental health and social services organisations have joined forces to review the way services are provided to people affected by mental illness in Australia, following their first ever Council of Non-Government Organisations (CONGO) on Mental Health meeting in Canberra earlier this year. The gathering committed to establishing a national vision for Australia to lead the world in mental health by 2022, so that within 10 years Australia is acknowledged internationally as the world leader in mental health services, programs, and outcomes. Copies of the Communiqué and CONGO Meeting Report are available on the Mental Health Council of Australia website.

Link related to this news item: www.mhca.org.au/index.php/component/rsfiles/download?path=Publications/CONGO%20on%20Mental%20Health%20Communiqu.pdf
Posted:Dec 7, 2012

New hope for Tourette's Syndrome (ABC AM)
ELIZABETH JACKSON: A scientist at the University of New South Wales has identified five genes that lead people to developing Tourette's Syndrome. There are links between these genes and other developmental conditions like obsessive compulsive disorder and autism. Professor Valsa Eapen says her research is helping patients to resist the urge to tic - the involuntary movements and noises most commonly associated with the syndrome. She's speaking here to our reporter Martin Cuddihy.
VALSA EAPEN: There are a number of new developmental genes that could get affected during that developmental process, which in turn can affect some of the circuitry that the brain really relies on for behaviours.
MARTIN CUDDIHY: And what you've discovered is that there are a number of developmental genes that overlap, and what does that mean for you research? What has that helped you identify?
VALSA EAPEN: We probably will be one step closer to understanding the function of each of these genes and how that might be connected in a pathological process within the brain, which then leads to the circuitry involvement.

Link related to this news item: www.abc.net.au/am/content/2012/s3640080.htm
Posted:Dec 7, 2012


Select a range to display
[ (1-5) (6-10) (11-15) (16-20) (21-25) (26-30) (31-35) (36-40) (41-45) (46-50) (51-55) (56-60) (61-65) ]